Before Nicea: The Early Followers of Prophet Jesus english islamic book pdf

Before Nicea: The Early Followers of Prophet Jesus english islamic book pdf

In some cases, the sources that we have used may be
unsympathetic towards Islam, but what is most striking is
to discover that parallels do exist between the early
Christianity of these studies and Islam. Often this appears
to be unapparent to the writers, but on occasions, some are
quite ready to admit this parallel. For example, Hans Küng
et al write that the, “traditional and historical parallels
between Judaic-Christianity and Islam are
inescapable.”4
Hans-Joachim Schoeps5
comes to a similar conclusion as
does Professor Eisenman. Indeed, as we stated earlier, the
knowledge of the similarities between early Christianity and
Islam has been studied thoroughly.
Writers such as Francis David (1510-1579), Michael
Servetus (1511-1553), Adam Neuser (circa 1570) and John
Toland (in 1718) were describing such parallels several
hundred years ago!6
4 Christianity and the World Religions – Paths of

word means ‘poor persons’ and continues to explain that
there is no evidence to support the claim of some Christian
writers that it is derived from a person called ‘Ebion,’ he
highlights: “The origin, history and distinct character
of the Ebionites has been subject to intense debate in
recent years. It is possible that the Ebionites go back
to the earliest period of Christian history, where most
Christians were Jews and some continued to observe
the Jewish law. If so, they would be the earliest
example of a Christian movement within Judaism that
was eventually left behind as Christianity adapted to
the influx of gentile converts. These Christians
eventually became a distinct group that, along with
other groups (e.g. the Gnostics) was rejected as
heretical by the emerging ‘great’ church. They are
sometimes identified with the Minim (heretics)
mentioned in the Talmud. The Ebionites were Jews
who accepted Jesus of Nazareth as the Messiah
(Christ) while continuing to maintain their identity as
Jews. They cultivated relations with Jews as well as
Christians though they were welcomed by neither.
They followed the Jewish law, insisting on
circumcision, keeping the Sabbath and celebrating the